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Groton Town Records Will Be Available Via the Internet

Town has joined the Connecticut Town Clerk’s Portal to allow 24/7 searching of documents.

Groton has found a way for the public to search town records from their homes, at no cost to the town.

The town joined with the Connecticut Town Clerk’s Portal to allow people to have 24-hour access to view or print town records, including deeds, liens and maps, the town clerk announced last week.

Groton worked with Cott Systems, a privately-owned software company to come up with low-cost ways of making public records more accessible, according to a press release. There is no cost to Groton for the service.

“This is an exciting addition to the services that the Town Clerk’s office already provides. Our professional searchers, as well as the general public will now have access to our land records from 1964 and all maps and trade name certificates to the present,” Groton Town Clerk Betsy Moukawsher said.

If a searcher needs to print an image, they can do so via the Internet at a cost of $1 per page, an amount set by state statute. The Connecticut State Portal is available at https://connecticut-townclerks-records.com.

The clerk’s office is one of the busiest places in Groton, with genealogists tracing family records, couples applying for marriage licenses, voters seeking absentee ballots and dog owners looking to license pets.

In the land records area, businesses file trade names, veterans file discharge papers and attorneys record documents and search land records.

“We are honored to be a part of Connecticut’s cutting-edge way of thinking and position our customer to enhance the solution offerings they provide their town,” the press release said.

Marie Tyler Wiley January 22, 2013 at 02:55 AM
Bravo to our town clerk Betsy!!! Job well done indeed! :)
Rick McDonald January 22, 2013 at 12:38 PM
Although convenient and free to the town their is a fee for use.
Betsy Moukawsher January 22, 2013 at 03:58 PM
Customers may view documents for free and print the index for free. If a customer wants additonal printed documents, they must set up an account with Cott Systems and pay the fees through their system. The town will retain $1 for each page printed.
Rick McDonald January 22, 2013 at 05:18 PM
Can you please verify that. I went to the site and the best I could tell without a paying you can only see the index of documents not the actual document. If you want to view the document you have to pay.
Daniella Ruiz January 23, 2013 at 09:00 PM
all these 'public documents' (all legally binding and so forth) must now be reviewed for correctness/errors, filed, archived (microfilmed)? and digitized under some contract. they used to do it with 'in house' employee's (paid thru town taxes), thus they were part of the solution, being PAID to do some task. that meant someone already forked over cash to provide these docs for viewing/printing AT the town hall. you would drive in, find it/look thru the vault/peruse/make notes (is there some reason you can't make personal images?) or ask them to print it via the xerox. the 'amazing new computer technology' was supposed to make this ALL so much better, easier, cheaper and accessible. what a joke! they (t clerk/assessor/planning/ etc) have full access to digitized versions at a touch of their fingertips, thru their in house LAN (and securely thru their own https network) lauding these efforts, while inflating the end user's cost is despicable. govt should SERVE the people, not treat them as an endless wallet to exploit. perhaps a return to 'the good old days' when new hire's were evaluated for ability to perform the job would be something to pass in front of the noses of the councils and appointed members of govt?

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